Maurice Ravel – Daphnis et Chloé (1912)

Daphnis et Chloé is a ballet with music by Maurice Ravel. Ravel described it as a “symphonie choréographique” (choreographic symphony). The scenario was adapted by Michel Fokine from an eponymous romance by the Greek writer Longus thought to date from around the 2nd century AD. Scott Goddard published a contemporary commentary that discussed the changes to the story that Fokine made to prepare a workable ballet scenario. The story concerns the love between the goatherd Daphnis and the shepherdess Chloé. The ballet is in one act and three scenes. Ravel began work on the score in 1909 after a commission from Sergei Diaghilev. It was premiered at the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris by his Ballets Russes on June 8, 1912. The orchestra was conducted by Pierre Monteux, the choreography was by Michel Fokine, and Vaslav Nijinsky and Tamara Karsavina danced the parts of Daphnis and Chloe. Léon Bakst designed the original sets.

Maurice Ravel – Bolero – choreographed by Maurice Béjart – performed by Maya Plisetskaya (1975)

Maya Plisetskaya’s dance set to Ravel’s Bolero is a stunning theatrical experience. There is something hypnotic about the rocking motion she sustains from start to finish, as though all that dance requires is the simple moving of weight from one foot to another. One woman, 40 men: is there something about the situation that is too hostile? Too aggressively sexual? What if it were one man and 40 women? Now a version with all men (and Jorge Donn in Plisetskaya’s role) – what role does subject matter (in this case, sex and gender as subject matter) play in a work of art? [Source]

Ravel: Bolero
Maurice Béjart
Maya Plisetskaya
Ballet del Siglo XX
1975