Riccardo Pick-Mangiagalli – 4 Poemi per orchestra op. 45 (1925)

Riccardo_Pick_Mangiagalli.jpg

Born: July 10, 1882 – Strakonice (Strakonitz), Bohemia
Died: July 8, 1949 – Milan, Italy

The Italian composer, Riccardo Pick-Mangiagalli, was of mixed Italian and Bohemian parentage. He studied at the Conservatory Giuseppe Verdi in Milan with Appiani (piano) and Ferrani (composition). He also studied in Prague and Vienna. Among his teachers was Richard Strauss.

Riccardo Pick-Mangiagalli began his career as a successful concert pianist, but later turned exclusively to composition. In 1936 he succeeded Pizzetti as director of the Conservatory Giuseppe Verdi, and held this post until his death.

Riccardo Pick-Mangiagalli has produced distinctive work, including number of compositions for the piano, chamber music (the Sonata for violin and piano; the String Quartet, the Ballata Sinfonica and the Humoresque for piano and orchestra, etc.) and a lot of stage works (ballets and operas). His first stage work, Salice d’Oro, a musical fable, was produced at Milan’s La Scala in 1913, and was followed by Il carillon magico (1918). Other stage works are Sumitra, a monomimic legend (1917), and Basi e Bote (1919-1920), lyric comedy, the libretto by Arrigo Boito.

4 Poemi per orchestra op. 45 was written in 1925.

1.Elegia
2.Menestrelli
3.L’armoniosa cuna
4.Ballata macabra

Orchestra della Rai di Milano, direttore Fulvio Vernizzi (1961).

See list of works here.

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Ruth Zechlin – Violin Concerto (1963)

Ruth Zechlin (1926-2007)
Violin Concerto (1963)
I. Allegro moderato [0:00]
II. Aria: Andante [5:22]

Egon Morbitzer, violin
Staatskapelle Berlin
conducted by Heinz Fricke
Recorded 2 January 1964 (monaural sound)

Jacob Druckman – Animus III, for clarinet and tape (1969)

The genesis of Animus III began with my asking Arthur Bloom to record some clarinet sounds as sources from which I could build the tape part of the work. The recording session was late at night. We worked efficiently and informally as we are good friends and colleagues of many years standing. The tape of that session contained not only the brilliant clarinet sounds of this extraordinary musician, but also the vocal sounds of the session–the laughter, the banter, the irritation, the fatigue, the impatience. Over all this fluttered the ephemeral virtuosity-untouched, uncommitted, disassociated from the human dynamic. As I worked with the tape in the following months, I found myself more and more fascinated with the recorded sounds of the irrational dynamic. These sounds began to shape the image of the work as strongly as the instrumental material from which, I believe, they are eventually inseparable.

The completed work assumes a surreal, aloof arch-virtuosity which follows its whimsy through many states leading to an eventual decay into a mindless hysteria. –Jacob Druckman

Art by Anna Kuyumcuoglu

Philip Glass at 80: Reflections and predictions for classical music’s future

Philip Glass reflects on his career to date including addressing why he isn’t a minimalist, his early years as an up-and-coming artist in New York which saw him supplement his income with stints as a plumber and cab driver, and what he thinks the future is for classical music.

American composer Philip Glass is one of the world’s most popular living composers. He has written prolifically for the stage, his works including several ballets and more than twenty operas. The Linbury Studio Theatre has been the site of two UK premieres of Glass chamber operas, with The Royal Opera producing Orphée in 2005 and Music Theatre Wales In the Penal Colony in 2010. In 2014 MTW gave the world premiere of Glass’s chamber opera The Trial in the Linbury. in the 2016/17 Season Javier De Frutos creates a new production of Glass’s dance opera Les Enfants Terribles for The Royal Ballet in the Barbican Theatre.

Glass was born in Baltimore and studied at the University of Chicago, the Juilliard School, and with Nadia Boulanger and Ravi Shankar. In 1967 he formed the Philip Glass Ensemble in New York. By 1974 had created a large collection of new music for the Philip Glass Ensemble and Mabou Mines Theater Company, culminating in Music in Twelve Parts and the landmark opera Einstein on the Beach. He went on to expand his repertory to include music for opera, dance, theatre, chamber ensemble, orchestra and film. His film scores have received Academy Award nominations (Kundun, The Hours, Notes on a Scandal) and a Golden Globe (The Truman Show). Further works include the operas Appomattox and The Perfect American (a co-commission between Teatro Real, Madrid, and English National Opera), the song cycle Ifé for Angelique Kidjo, the Double Piano Concerto for Katia and Marielle Labèque and the Los Angeles Philharmonic and his memoir Words Without Music (Liveright Publishing).

Glass presents lectures, workshops and solo keyboard performances around the world and has created collaborations with such figures as David Bowie, Allen Ginsberg, Woody Allen, Paul Simon, Yo-Yo Ma, Doris Lessing and Twyla Tharp.

Alireza Mashayekhi – Violin Concerto (1977)

Alireza Mashayekhi (born 1940) is a notable Iranian musician, composer and conductor. He is one of the first Iranian composers who has pioneered Persian Symphonic Music [source]

Maziyar Zahireddini – violin
Tehran Symphony Orchestra conducted by Edo Micic
1998
Live Recording

[Read more]

 

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