Dieter Ammann – glut (2016)

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Dieter Ammann: “glut” (2014-2016) for orchestra, Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich. (The images of the score are examples and are not meant to correspond to the music being heard).

“A world whose inner glow, shaped into sound, drives towards the external.” This is how Dieter Ammann describes his new orchestral work, composed as part of the “Œuvres Suisses” for the Tonhalle Orchestra and the Bern Symphony Orchestra. The title glut can be understood in both German and English and determines the programme of the work. Translated, it means blaze, glow, fervour. Dieter Ammann’s music is generally characterised by its open, energetic, surprising and communicative quality, and consistently through a high density, a refined, sophisticated texture. glut now continues in the same vein: “Even by my standards”, says Ammann, the new work is “characterised by an exceptionally high concentration of events. This concentration relates not only to what is heard simultaneously – that is the vertical – but also to the multitude and complexity of the processed concepts of sound, and therefore to the great diversity of textures which successively unfold in the course of the piece.”

The greatest possible diversity of musical material is used in order to illuminate the “machine of the orchestra” from various angles, and to realize the composer’s acoustic vision. What results is a constantly changing topography of sounding phenomena, held together dramaturgically firstly by references forwards and backwards to events, and secondly through “steady” harmonic fields, some of which acquire the function of caesura because of their extended duration. Through this, they make the formal sequence more comprehensible, similar to the way that cadences assume this function in major-minor tonal music.

glut, this time in the sense of fervour, also becomes a metaphor for the process of composing: the title stands, according to Ammann “for the passion of researching in one place for months at a time, of burying yourself in the infinite mass of possible sounds, and so of stumbling into areas which were unknown to you before. There, only a slow, intuitive moving forward is possible in order to give shape to the imagined. At the same time, however, a music of this kind developing in every dimension, that is from the single note via complete passages to the overall form, must be examined and tested in its substance, which in turn requires a rational approach. Working on this piece, to maintain the contradiction, also therefore means to be on a journey in a world as a searcher, at the same time as you are its own creator.’

Alva Noto & Ryuichi Sakamoto – Vrioon (2002)

Vrioon is the debut collaboration album between Ryuichi Sakamoto and Alva Noto, released in 2002 [source]

Music By – Alva Noto and Ryuichi Sakamoto

Piano – Ryuichi Sakamoto / Sounds [Additional Sounds] – Carsten Nicolai

  1.  “Uoon I” 13:51
  2.  “Uoon II” 9:40
  3.  “Duoon” 5:46
  4.  “Noon” 10:13
  5.  “Trioon I” 5:09
  6.  “Trioon II” 9:57

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Hanns Eisler – 14 Arten den Regen zu beschreiben (14 Ways To Describe The Rain), Op. 70 (1941)

In 1941, Eisler wrote music for the 1929 black-and-white documentary Rain by legendary Dutch director Joris Ivens. The Ivens website describes the film as “a very poetic film with changing moods, following the change from sunny Amsterdam streets to rain drops in the canals and the pooring rain on windows, umbrellas, trams and streets, until it clears up and the sun breaks through once again.” Eisler’s score was written as an experiment for the Rockefeller Foundation’s Film Music Project at the New School in New York City. The music does not exactly correspond to the mood of each image in the film; instead, it explores the textures of sadness—an unusual theme for Eisler. The chamber suite based on the film score was one of Eisler’s favorite works and is a study in his communicative style of twelve-tone music. It was premièred in Arnold Schönberg’s home in Los Angeles for the elder composer’s seventieth birthday celebration in 1944. [source]

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Sándor Veress – Hommage à Paul Klee (1951)

Composed By – Sándor Veress / Conductor – Heinz Holliger / Orchestra – Budapest Festival Orchestra / Piano – András Schiff and Dénes Várjon

Sándor Veress was a Swiss composer of Hungarian origin. He has (among others) been teached by Zoltán Kodály and Béla Bartók, and he has teached György Ligeti, György Kurtág, Heinz Holliger, Heinz Marti, Jürg Wyttenbach and Roland Moser.

I : Zeichen in Gelb, Allegro (Mark in Yellow)

II : Feuerwind, Allegro molto (Fire wind)

III : Alter Klang, Andante con moto (Old Sound)

IV : Unten und oben, Allegretto piacevole (Below and Above)

V : Steinsammlung, Allegretto (Stone Collection)

VI : Grün in Grün, Andante (Green in Green)

VII : Kleiner Blauteufel, Vivo (Little Blue Devil)

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Pascal Dusapin – Aufgang (2012)

l’Orchestre de la Suisse Romande

Conductor: Osmo Vänskä

Violin: Renaud Capuçon

Victoria Hall de Genève (Jan. 2014).

Kindly recorded and presented by RTS.ch

This composition was commissioned by Renaud Capuçon.

NOTES
I like the German word ‘Aufgang’, because it suggests a rising movement. The French translation – échelle (‘scale’) or escalier (‘stairway’) – is necessarily an approach that expresses more of a concept than a movement. The word ‘Aufgang’ came to me rather spontaneously while I was composing, when I couldn’t find a way into the space that the desire for this concerto form had led to. I find it extremely difficult to express what I wanted with this concerto and how I was trying to go about it. I started working on it in 2008. Then I had to put it away. It was the first time that something like that had happened to me. I didn’t want to have anything more to do with it and I gave up the project. Several years later, thanks to the generous and enthusiastic initiative of Renaud Capuçon, I picked it up again and completed it in 2011. To do that, on the one hand I had to start all over again, but on the other hand carry on with everything. [source]

Renaud Capuçon:

Pascal Dusapin:

Pascal Dusapin

[This blogpost is inspired by Ronnie Rocket, thanks]

Ravi Shankar with Philip Glass – Passages (1990)

Passages is a collaborative chamber music studio album co-composed by Ravi Shankar and Philip Glass, released in 1990 through Atlantic Records. The album’s content is a hybrid of Hindustani classical music and Glass’ distinct American minimal contemporary classical style. [source]

Tim Baker, violin / S. P. Balasubrahmanyam, vocals / Seymour Barab, cello / Al Brown, viola / Ashit Desai, conductor / Blaise Dupuy, engineer Barry / Finclair, viola, violin / Mayuki Fukuhara, violin / Jeannie Gagné, voices / Jon Gibson, soprano saxophone / Philip Glass, performer, producer / Peter Gordon, French horn / Regis Iandiorio, violin / Rory Johnston, executive producer / Karen Karlsrud, violin / Abhiman Kaushal, tabla / Jack Kripl, alto saxophone, flute / Suresh Lalwani, arranger, conductor, mixing, orchestral assistant, producer / Regis Landiorio, violin / Beverly Lauridsen, cello / Batia Lieberman, cello / Ronu Mazumdar, flute / Michael McGrath, assistant engineer / Kurt Munkacsi, producer / Keith O’Quinn, trombone / Richard Peck, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone / Melanie Penny, art direction / Martin Perlich, liner notes / Lenny Pickett, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone / Alan Raph, trombone / Michael Riesman, conductor, mixing, piano / Ebet Roberts, photography Partha Sarathy, sarod, veena / Sergiu Schwartz, violin / Ron Sell, French horn / Ravi Shankar, arranger, orchestration, performer, producer, vocals / Shubho Shankar, sitar / Richard Sortomme, viola / T. Srinivasan, drum sounds, mridangam / A.R. Swaminathan, engineer / Masako Yanagita, viola, violin / Frederick Zlotkin, cello

  1. “Offering” (Ravi Shankar)– 9:47
  2. “Sadhanipa” (Philip Glass) – 8:37
  3. “Channels and Winds” (Philip Glass) – 8:00
  4. “Ragas in Minor Scale” (Philip Glass) – 7:37
  5. “Meetings Along the Edge” (Ravi Shankar) – 8:11
  6. “Prashanti” (Ravi Shankar) – 13:40

[buy]

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