Album: Isang Yun, Concertino; Duo; Intermezzo; Pezzo Fantasioso (Wergo)

The concertina rarely features in classical music outside the work of Astor Piazzolla or Pauline Oliveiros, and its use alongside strings in these four pieces is indicative of the Korean composer Isang Yun’s fondness for unusual instrumental combinations. The Taoist principles behind his work are perhaps most evident in the rising figures representing the shift from darkness to light in Duo, or the contrast between the high, bird-like violins and the vibrant chord-clusters of Stefan Hussong’s accordion in Concertino. Originally scored for cello and piano, Intermezzo is less diverse, with the cello’s bowed lowing occupying similar space to the accompanying accordion drone. [The Independent].

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Music review: David Aaron Carpenter, violist

One of the good things about violists is that they have repertoire nobody else knows about.

David Aaron Carpenter‘s impressive recital at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music on Sunday afternoon, presented by San Francisco Performances, offered more than just the spectacle of a gifted young artist coming into his own. It also included some first-rate music that shows up all too rarely on concert programs.

The effect, at least during the first half of the program, was to leave a listener with a distracting embarrassment of riches. Here was Carpenter, joined by pianist Julien Quentin in a performance marked by wonderful fervor and eloquence, and here too were delectable, fascinating pieces by York Bowen and Rebecca Clarke that were probably known only to the hard-core viola aficionados in the audience.

Read the full article on SFgate.com here.

2007 review in The New York Times here.