James Levine steps down from Boston Symphony

James Levine, music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, is to relinquish the role at the end of the current season. Dogged by ill health, he has had to cancel an increasing number of appearances with the orchestra. The search is now on for a successor, though the BSO are also considering a new role for Levine, who has led them since 2004.

Read the full article in Gramophone here.

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When the Kids Come Out to Play

IN the world of the contemporary symphony orchestra, youth is not so much a stage of life as it is a battle cry. Youth orchestras! Young conductors! At times it begins to seem that nothing else counts.

Last December in Vienna, Christoph Koncz, a cherubic ex-concert master with the training orchestra at the Verbier Festival, in the Swiss Alps, and now, at 22, a principal second violin with the Vienna Philharmonic, recalled the Salzburg Festival debut of the Simón Bolívar Youth Orchestra under the fire-eating Gustavo Dudamel, then 27, in 2008.

Whether craving such magic or out of pure altruism, A-list conductors in ever-increasing numbers attach themselves to ensembles like the Verbier Festival Orchestra (long associated with James Levine), the Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra (organized on the initiative of Claudio Abbado) and the Luigi Cherubini Youth Orchestra (founded by Riccardo Muti). Last August in Salzburg, Franz Welser-Möst, music director of the Cleveland Orchestra, explained the appeal. “Professional orchestras are jaundiced,” he said. “Youth orchestras are full of enthusiasm. Old maestros love that.”

Read the full article in The New York Times here.