Chiara String Quartet at Le Poisson Rouge

Just before the Chiara String Quartet played Webern’s Five Movements for String Quartet on Wednesday evening at Le Poisson Rouge, the group’s first violinist, Rebecca Fischer, pointed out that the work was 101 years old. There was a sense of wonder in her tone — an unspoken subtext that seemed to ask, “Can you believe that people still hear this antique as harsh modernism?” Ms. Fischer added that for her, the movements are five “tiny landscapes.”

Read the full review in The New York Times here.

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Anthony Braxton – Tri-Centric Modeling: Past, Present, and Future

Featuring Anthony Braxton 12+1tet, plus performances by Marilyn Crispell-Mark Dresser-Gerry Hemingway trio; Steve Coleman-Jonathan Finlayson duo, Nicole Mitchell, Richard Teitelbaum, Matthew Welch, John Zorn-Dave Douglas-Brad Jones-Gerry Hemingway quartet, and more special guests to be announced

The Tri-Centric Foundation presents a two-day benefit fundraiser event celebrating the artistic legacy of composer Anthony Braxton, in honor of his 65th birthday. In addition to rare NYC appearances by Braxton himself, the two concerts will feature a host of performers who have performed with or been deeply influenced by his music, playing both their own music and Braxton compositions. All proceeds will go to benefit the Tri-Centric Foundation, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to perpetuating and realizing the most ambitious projects in the ongoing work and legacy of composer Anthony Braxton, and to cultivating and inspiring the next generation of creative artists to pursue their own visions with the kind of idealism and integrity that Braxton has demonstrated thoughout his five decade career.

– At Le Poisson Rouge, June 18, doors will open at 5:30pm, and performers will include the Anthony Braxton 12+1tet, plus performances by Marilyn Crispell-Mark Dresser-Gerry Hemingway trio; Steve Coleman-Jonathan Finlayson duo, Nicole Mitchell, Richard Teitelbaum, Matthew Welch, John Zorn-Dave Douglas-Brad Jones-Gerry Hemingway quartet, and more special guests to be announced.

– At Issue Project Roon, June 19, doors will open at 5:30, and the performance will include excerpts from Braxton’s recently recorded four-act opera, Trillium E, in addition to sets featuring the recent generation of Braxton-influenced artists, including Taylor Ho Bynum, Mary Halvorson & Jessica Pavone, Chris Jonas & James Fei, Andrew Raffo Dewar, Tyshawn Sorey, and many more musicians to be announced.

This is a general admission, standing event.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=1649962&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1

Anthony Braxton 12(+1)tet from Jason Guthartz on Vimeo.

The Kronos Quartet / Terry Riley at Zankel Hall, New York City

The Kronos Quartet is ensconced at Carnegie Hall for a Perspectives series that explores the expansive, stylistically borderless repertory for which this ensemble is known, with master classes and a program by student quartets along the way. The group made a down payment on this minifestival in November, when it performed Tan Dun’s “Ghost Opera” and the pageantlike “Chinese Home” during Carnegie Hall’s festival of Chinese music. But the series got under way in earnest on Thursday evening, with a program of Terry Riley’s music at Zankel Hall.

Single-composer programs are rare for the Kronos, but the Riley program celebrated a relationship that dates back 30 years, to Kronos’s early days, and has yielded 26 works. Kronos built its program around three of the latest, with glances back at two earlier scores as well.

All this music addresses, however abstractly, Mr. Riley’s longstanding interest in fostering peace. And two of the new works focus more specifically on how children see the world around them and what they will make of the planet they are inheriting.

Read the full review in The New York Times here.

Pioneer jazz legend Ornette Coleman turns 80

NEW YORK CITY – A conversation with Ornette Coleman can begin with a straightforward question, but the answer will dart in an unexpected direction, roaming over unpredictable terrain: love, sex, God, life, ideas.

It’s fascinating, maddening and a tremendous insight into the way this groundbreaking saxophonist, avant-garde composer and free-jazz innovator approaches his work, and his perspective on life. Every utterance has weight, a meaning tucked inside its oblique delivery.

“The human race has a quality to it that no other form of life has, and it’s not something they bought, it’s something they’re born with,” Coleman says, perched on a black leather sofa in his Garment District loft. “That’s pretty heavy.”

Precious little about the Fort Worth native is conventional.

Read the full article here.

Classical 2.0 with Hilary Hahn


Hilary Hahn, the American violinist, is about to release a new cd of music by JS Bach, called “Bach: Violin and Voice.”

We’ve talked about Hilary Hahn before on the show. After all, she’s one of the most new-media savvy classical performers out there. (Remember when her “violin case” started its own twitter feed? She was definitely ahead of the curve on that one.)

Anyway, in honor of this new release, Hilary Hahn is offering to answer questions from her fans, via YouTube.

She’s set up a special email address, and she’s promising to record her answers on video, and post them on her YouTube channel, this coming Monday, January 11th.

Oh, and she’s also holding a “Bach Party” at the very cool New York nightclub le Poisson Rouge.

So if you’d like to interact with Hilary Hahn, electronically, send her an email to the following address: promotion@firstchairpromo.com this week.

The album comes out in the US this Tuesday; the Canadian release is a week later, January 19th, on the Deutsche Grammophon label, but we’ve snagged an advance copy, which we’ll share with you today on In Tune!

[via cbc.ca]

The Score: The End of Music by Glenn Branca

We seem to be on the edge of a paradigm shift. Orchestras are struggling to stay alive, rock has been relegated to the underground, jazz has stopped evolving and become a dead art, the music industry itself has been subsumed by corporate culture and composers are at their wit’s end trying to find something that’s hip but still appeals to an audience mired in a 19th-century sensibility.