Steve Reich and Musicians – Drumming (1971)

Recorded January 1974 in Hamburg Germany. Original Deutsche Grammophon Studio Recording. From the  3 × Vinyl, LP  Box Set : Steve Reich ‎– Drumming / Music For Mallet Instruments, Voices And Organ / Six Pianos

Drumming is a piece by minimalist composer Steve Reich, dating from 1970–1971.[1] Reich began composition of the work after a short visit to Africa and observing music and musical ensembles there, especially under the Anlo Ewe master drummer Gideon Alorwoyie in Ghana. His visit was cut short after contracting malaria. K. Robert Schwarz describes the work as “minimalism’s first masterpiece. [source]

Part One – Starts 0:00

Steve Reich – tuned bongo drums and voice
Russ Hartenburger – tuned bongo drums
Bob Becker – tuned bongo drums
James Preiss – tuned bongo drums

Part Two – starts 24:30

James Preiss – marimbas
Tim Ferchen – marimbas
Russ Hartenburger – marimbas
Steve Reich – marimbas
Steve Chambers – marimbas
Cornelius Cardew – marimbas
Bob Becker – marimbas
Ben Harms – marimbas
Glen Valdez – marimbas
Joan La Barbara – vocals
Jay Clayton – vocals

Part Three – starts 51:00

Glen Valdez – glockenspiel
Bob Becker – glockenspiel
Russ Hartenburger – glockenspiel
James Priess – glockenspiel
Steve Reich – voice (whistling)
Leslie Scott – piccolo

Part Four – starts 1:05:30

Tim Ferchen – tuned bongo drums
Steve Reich – tuned bongo drums
Steve Chambers – tuned bongo drums
Russ Hartenberger – marimbas
Bob Becker – marimbas
Glen Valdez – marimbas
James Preiss – glockenspiel
Ben Harms – glockenspiel
Cornelius Cardew – glockenspiel
Leslie Scott – piccolo
Joan La Barbara – vocals
Jay Clayton – vocals

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Isang Yun: Piri for Solo Oboe (1971)

Isang Yun (also spelled Yun I-sang; 17 September 1917 – 3 November 1995) was a Korean-born composer who made his later career in Germany. Yun’s primary musical concern was the development of Korean music by the means of Western avantgarde music. After experimenting with 12-tone techniques Yun developed his own musical personality in his works of the early 1960s, post-serialistic “sound compositions”. Yun’s music employed techniques associated with traditional Korean music, such as glissandi, pizzicati, portamenti, vibrati, and above all a very rich vocabulary of ornaments. Essential is the presence of multiple-melodic lines, which Yun called “Haupttöne” (“central” or “main tones”).[source]

[Read here; Isang Young in a conversation with Bruce Duffie]

[Read about Yuns use of Hauptton technique in Piri (page 35)]

Heinz Holliger – Solo Oboe

 

Isang Yun

 

 

 

 

 

 

[inspired by Ronnie Rocket, thanks a lot]

George Crumb – Vox Balaenae (Voice of the Whale) (1971)

Three masked players: electric flute, electric cello, and amplified piano.

First performed by the New York Camerata at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. – 17 March 1972.

Introduction text by George Crumb himself:

Vox Balaenae (Voice of the Whale), composed in 1971 for the New York Camerata, is scored for flute, cello and piano (all amplified in concert performance). The work was inspired by the singing of the humpback whale, a tape recording of which I had heard two or three years previously. Each of the three performers is required to wear a black half-mask (or visor-mask). The masks, by effacing the sense of human projection, are intended to represent, symbolically, the powerful impersonal forces of nature (i.e. nature dehumanized). I have also suggested that the work be performed under deep-blue stage lighting.

The form of Voice of the Whale is a simple three-part design, consisting of a prologue, a set of variations named after the geological eras, and an epilogue.

The opening Vocalise (marked in the score: “wildly fantastic, grotesque”) is a kind of cadenza for the flutist, who simultaneously plays his instrument and sings into it. This combination of instrumental and vocal sound produces an eerie, surreal timbre, not unlike the sounds of the humpback whale. The conclusion of the cadenza is announced by a parody of the opening measures of Strauss’ Also sprach Zarathustra.

The Sea-Theme (“solemn, with calm majesty”) is presented by the cello (in harmonics), accompanied by dark, fateful chords of strummed piano strings. The following sequence of variations begins with the haunting sea-gull cries of the Archezoic (“timeless, inchoate”) and, gradually increasing in intensity, reaches a strident climax in the Cenozoic (“dramatic, with a feeling of destiny”). The emergence of man in the Cenozoic era is symbolized by a partial restatement of the Zarathustra reference.

The concluding Sea-Nocturne (“serene, pure, transfigured”) is an elaboration of the Sea-Theme. The piece is couched in the “luminous” tonality of B major and there are shimmering sounds of antique cymbals (played alternately by the cellist and flutist). In composing the Sea-Nocturne I wanted to suggest “a larger rhythm of nature” and a sense of suspension in time. The concluding gesture of the work is a gradually dying series of repetitions of a 10-note figure. In concert performance, the last figure is to be played “in pantomime” (to suggest a diminuendo beyond the threshold of hearing!); for recorded performances, the figure is played as a “fade-out”. [Source]

Dolce Suono Trio – Mimi Stillman, flute, Yumi Kendall, cello, Charles Abramovic, piano – perfoms George Crumb’s Vox Balaenae (Voice of the Whale) at Haverford College, PA (October, 2007). http://www.mimistillman.org http://www.dolcesuono.com.