Alireza Mashayekhi – Violin Concerto (1977)

Alireza Mashayekhi (born 1940) is a notable Iranian musician, composer and conductor. He is one of the first Iranian composers who has pioneered Persian Symphonic Music [source]

Maziyar Zahireddini – violin
Tehran Symphony Orchestra conducted by Edo Micic
1998
Live Recording

[Read more]

 

Buy the CD here

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György Ligeti – String Quartet No. 2 Cello (1968)

Recorded at Henry Wood Hall, Trinity Church Square, London on July 13-15, 1994.

Performed by Arditti String Quartet: Rohan de Saram – Cello / Garth Knox – Viola / David Alberman – Violin / Irvine Arditti – Violin

György Ligeti’s String Quartet No. 2 is a string quartet that was composed between February and August 1968.[1] It consists of five movements:  Allegro nervoso Sostenuto, molto calmo Come un meccanismo di precisione Presto furioso, brutale, tumultuoso Allegro con delicatezza It is approximately 21 minutes in duration. It is dedicated to the LaSalle Quartet who gave its first performance in Baden-Baden on the 14 December 1969. [source]

György Sándor Ligeti (28 May 1923 – 12 June 2006) was a composer of contemporary classical music. He has been described as “one of the most important avant-garde composers in the latter half of the twentieth century” and “one of the most innovative and influential among progressive figures of his time”.[1]  Born in Transylvania, Romania, he lived in Hungary before emigrating and becoming an Austrian citizen. [source]

Here is the full concert:

“Now there is no taboo; everything is allowed. But one cannot simply go back to tonality, it’s not the way. We must find a way of neither going back nor continuing the avant-garde. I am in a prison: one wall is the avant-garde, the other wall is the past, and I want to escape.”
– György Ligeti
Said in A lecture at the New England Conservatory in 1993

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[Inspired by Viktória Nádas]

Rued Langgaard – String Quartet no. 5 (1925)

String Quartet no. 5  is composed by the danish composer Rued Langgaard. Here played by Kontra Kvartetten:

Peter Fabricius – Bratsch
Anton Kontra – Violin
Boris Samsing – Violin
Morten Zeuthen – Cello

Rued Langgaard (born Rud Immanuel Langgaard; 28 July 1893 – 10 July 1952) was a late-Romantic Danish composer and organist. His then-unconventional music was at odds with that of his Danish contemporaries and was recognized only 16 years after his death. [source]

The danish filmproducer Peter Aalbaek who normally work together with Lars Von Trier is planning to make a feature movie about Rued Langgaard. Aalbaek has been fascinated by Langgaards history throughout his career, and his graduation film from the Film School also portrayed the composer.

picture from the homepage of Rued Langgaard Selskabet:

www.ruedlanggaardselskabet

 

Sofia Gubaidulina – The Canticle of the Sun (1997, rev. 1998)

Glorification of the Creator, and His Creations – the Sun and the Moon
Glorification of the Creator, the Maker of
the four elements: air, water, fire and earth
Glorification of life
Glorification of death

Sofia Gubaidulina’s 80th birthday in October 2011 generated much press coverage around the world, appropriately stressing the uniqueness and the variety of her compositional approaches. Both are in evidence on these recordings from Lockenhaus. “Canticle of the Sun”, recorded in 2010, revisits the celebrated piece that Gubaiduilina wrote in tribute to Mstislav Rostropovich on the occasion of his 70th birthday in 1997. Rostropovich’s famously sunny disposition was an inspiration, by association prompting Gubaidulina to set St Francis of Assisi’s “Canticle of the Sun” for choir. In this recording, Nicolas Altstaedt, one of the most accomplished cellists of his generation, takes on the highly expressive lead role. A further, timely, Lockenhaus connection here: as of this year, Altsteadt takes over from Kremer as the new director of the Lockenhaus Chamber Music Festival. [source]

Gidon Kremer: Violin
Marta Sudraba: Violoncello
Nicolas Altstaedt: Violoncello
Andrei Pushkarev: Percussion
Rihards Zalupe: Percussion
Rostislav Krimer: Celesta
Riga Chamber Choir Kamēr…
Māris Sirmais: Conductor

The Canticle of the Sun (1997, rev. 1998)
for violoncello, chamber choir, percussion and celesta
Dedicated to Mstislav Rostropovich
Recorded July 2010 at Lockenhaus Festival
ECM Records New Series 2256
Genre: Classical
Style: Experimental, New Music, Post-Modern

Canticle of the Sun revisits the celebrated piece that Gubaidulina wrote in tribute to Mstislav Rostropovich on the occasion of his 70th birthday.

 

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Tōru Takemitsu – Distance de fée (1951)

“Distance de fée” created in 1951, one of the best pieces of Takemitsu’s early period. The spirit of Debussy and Messiaen are fully felt in this work of approximately 7 and 1/2 minutes duration. Messiaen’s octatonic scale is used in the tonal language. The opening lyrical theme is repeated several times, and finds a new pathway upon each return – this is a version of variation as well as rondo form, two of Takemitsu’s favorite compositional procedures. This piece, like many others by Takemitsu, was inspired by poetry, in this case, a poem of the same title by Shuzo Takiguchi (1903-1979). This work describes, with lightly mythological imagery, an elusive, transparent creature living in “air’s labyrinth … it lives in the spring breeze That barely resembled the balance of a small bird” source

Arisa Fujita – Violin / Megumi Fujita – Piano

From the album Between Tides and Other Chamber Music with compositions by Toru Takemitsu, with Fujita Piano Trio, released in 2001.

Another excellent recording with unknown performers:

toru takemitsu

 

Toshio Hosokawa – Vertical Time Study III (1994)

Toshio Hosokawa (細川 俊夫 Hosokawa Toshio, born 23 October 1955 in Hiroshima, Japan) is a Japanese composer of contemporary classical music Hosokawa studied with Yun Isang at the Berlin University of the Arts. Since 1998, Hosokawa has served as Composer-in-Residence at the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra. In 2004, Hosokawa became a guest professor at Tokyo College of Music. In 2001, Hosokawa became a member of Akademie der Künste, Berlin. [source]

Irvine Ardetti – Violin
Ichiro Nodairo – Piano

ToshioHosokawa

Luigi Nono: Fragmente-Stille, an Diotima (1979)

In 1979, after a three year long compositional crisis, Luigi Nono returned to composition with a series of works which seemed to be radically different from anything he had made in the preceding three decades. One of these works is the string quartet Fragmente-Stille, an Diotima, which was premiered by the LaSalle Quartet in 1980. Few postwar works have been commented – and praised – as much as this quartet. Only a year after the premiere, Heinz-Klaus Metzger called it Nono’sturning point, and thirty years later, David Metzer looked back at it as one of the works from around 1980 that introduced a new phase of musical modernism. [source]

Diotima was Socrates’ teacher, and is associated with the concept of time. Performed by the Arditti String Quartet, this music is guided by lines from Holderlin’s famous poem, which are present only as an unspoken meditation and guidepost written into the score in 52 places. Nono poses the fundamental questions “Where am I, and who am I?” by examining old music and memories from the distant past as producers of both pain and hope. The composer seeks to “externalize as fully as possible that which has been internalized….” He concludes, “That is what matters today.” [source]

COMPOSER : Luigi Nono

QUARTUAR ARDETTI:
Rohan de Saram – Cello
Levine Andrade – Viola
David Alberman – Violin
Irvine Arditti – Violin

Recorded in Cologne, July 1990 and released in 1991 on Montaigne.

 

 

 

 

 

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Grażyna Bacewicz – Violin Concerto No.1 (1937)

Violin Concerto No.1 is written by Grażyna Bacewiczs in 1937. This recording is from the CD Grazyna Bacewicz: Violin Concertos Nos. 1, 3, 7, recorded in 2008 and 2009.

Chandos certainly hedged its bets right when it came to programming its second release with Polish violinist Joanna Kurkowicz; although they are well known and popular in former Eastern bloc countries, the violin concertos of Polish composer Grażyna Bacewicz have never been circulated on recordings in the West.

The Violin Concerto No. 1 (1937) was written for Bacewicz herself to play. The earlier concerto is attuned to neo-classicism and French style, whereas folk motifs dominate the later one. Very beautiful and technically assured concerti. [source]

I. Allegro  (4:05)
II. Andante (Molto Espressivo) (4:40)
III. Vivace – Meno Mosso, Ma Non Troppo – Più Mosso – Tempo I (3:30)

Joanna Kurkowicz, Violin
Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Conductor – Lukasz Borowicz

 

 

 

[inspired by Ronnie Rocket, thanks a lot. And thanks to CLASSICAL20.COM]

 

Galina Ustvolskaya – I – Reinbert de Leeuw, Vera Beths, Harmen de Boer (full CD); Trio (1949), Sonata No. 5 (1986), Duet (1964)

Galina Ivanovna USTVOLSKAYA (1919 — 2006) was a Russian composer of classical music. Ustvolskaya developed her own very particular style, of which she said, “There is no link whatsoever between my music and that of any other composer, living or dead.” Among its characteristics are: the use of repeated, homophonic blocks of sound, which prompted the Dutch critic Elmer Schönberger to call her “the lady with the hammer”…  [source]

Trio – for violin, clarinet and piano (1949) (16:48)
Sonata No. 5 – in ten movements, for piano (1986) (17:39)
Duet – for violin and piano (1964) (23:47)

Total time: 58:37.

Harmen de Boer – Clarinet (track 1) / Reinbert de Leeuw – Piano / Vera Beths – Violin (track 1,3)

Digital recording: October 5 & 6 1991, De Vereeniging, Nijmegen. The Trio is in three movements, marked espressivo (8:30), dolce (3:33) and energico (4:45), but is indexed as a single track. The CD was released in 1992 on hat ART records. Copyright (c) Hat Hut Records Ltd.

 

 

 

 

 

[inspired by Adrian Aurelius, thanks a lot]