Alva Noto & Ryuichi Sakamoto – Vrioon (2002)

Vrioon is the debut collaboration album between Ryuichi Sakamoto and Alva Noto, released in 2002 [source]

Music By – Alva Noto and Ryuichi Sakamoto

Piano – Ryuichi Sakamoto / Sounds [Additional Sounds] – Carsten Nicolai

  1.  “Uoon I” 13:51
  2.  “Uoon II” 9:40
  3.  “Duoon” 5:46
  4.  “Noon” 10:13
  5.  “Trioon I” 5:09
  6.  “Trioon II” 9:57

R-83299-1196618246.jpeg

Advertisements

Sándor Veress – Hommage à Paul Klee (1951)

Composed By – Sándor Veress / Conductor – Heinz Holliger / Orchestra – Budapest Festival Orchestra / Piano – András Schiff and Dénes Várjon

Sándor Veress was a Swiss composer of Hungarian origin. He has (among others) been teached by Zoltán Kodály and Béla Bartók, and he has teached György Ligeti, György Kurtág, Heinz Holliger, Heinz Marti, Jürg Wyttenbach and Roland Moser.

I : Zeichen in Gelb, Allegro (Mark in Yellow)

II : Feuerwind, Allegro molto (Fire wind)

III : Alter Klang, Andante con moto (Old Sound)

IV : Unten und oben, Allegretto piacevole (Below and Above)

V : Steinsammlung, Allegretto (Stone Collection)

VI : Grün in Grün, Andante (Green in Green)

VII : Kleiner Blauteufel, Vivo (Little Blue Devil)

R-6980532-1430913714-8650.jpeg

 

Georg Friedrich Haas – Limited Approximations (2010)

for 6 micro-tonally tuned pianos and orchestra (2010)

Played by: Akiko Okabe, Pi-Hsien Chen, Christoph Grund, Florian Hoelscher, Julia Vogelsänger & Sven Thomas Kiebler – Piano

SWR-Sinfonieorchester Baden-Baden und Freiburg
Conducted by Sylvain Cambreling

Georg Friedrich Haas was born in 1953 in Graz, a city in the east of Austria. His childhood was spent in the mountainous province of Vorarlberg, on the Swiss border. The landscape and the atmosphere of the place have left a lasting impression on his personality. The atmosphere was marked not so much by natural beauty in the accepted sense of the word. Rather, Haas experienced the mountains as a menace; he felt closed in by the narrow valley where the sun rarely penetrated. Nature for him represented a dark force. The composer adds: “Just as important for me was the experience of being an outsider: unlike my younger siblings, I never learned to speak the local Alemannic dialect. [source]

[read more]

haas

 

John Cage – Music of Changes (1951)

Music of Changes is a piece for solo piano by John Cage. Composed in 1951 for pianist and friend David Tudor, it is Cage’s earliest fully indeterminate instrumental work.

Music of Changes was the second fully indeterminate work Cage composed (the first is Imaginary Landscape No. 4, completed in April 1951, and the third movement of Concerto for prepared piano also used chance[1]), and the first instrumental work that uses chance throughout. He was still using magic square-like charts to introduce chance into composition, when, in early 1951, Christian Wolff presented Cage with a copy of the I Ching (Wolff’s father published a translation of the book at around the same time).[2] This Chinese classic text is a symbol system used to identify order in chance events. For Cage it became a perfect tool to create chance-controlled compositions: he would “ask” the book questions about various aspects of the composition at hand, and use the answers to compose. In effect, the vast majority of pieces Cage completed after 1951 were created using the I Ching. [source]

Book I (New York, May 16, 1951)
Book II (New York, August 2, 1951)
Book III (New York, October 18, 1951)
Book IV (New York, December 13, 1951)

john-cage_1292184654_crop_576x390

Bernhard Lang – Differenz/Wiederholung 1.2 (2002)

Differenz/Wiederholung 1.2 is composed by Bernhard Lang for Flute, Tenor Saxophone and Piano.

Philippe Racine (flute)
Marcus Weiss (tenor saxophone)
Paulo Alvares (piano)

Bernhard Lang (February 24, 1957 in Linz) is an Austrian composer, improvisationalist and programmer of musical patches and applications. His work can be described as modern contemporary music, with roots, however, in various genres such as 20th-century avant-garde, European classical music, jazz, free jazz, rock, punk, techno, EDM, electronica, electronic music and computer-generated music. Bernhard Lang came to prominence with his work cycle “Differenz / Wiederholung” (“difference / repetition”) in which he illuminated and examined the themes of reproductive and DJ cultures based on the philosophic work of Gilles Deleuze.  [source]

dw1 war das erste stück der differenz/wiederholungsserie, in dem ich vom prinzip der vorangehenden schrift-stücke dahingehend abwich, dass ich bestimmte details meiner handschrift virtuell sampelte und loopte; das wiederholungszeichen und die anzahl der wiederholungen wurden mit einem mal beherrschende parameter des stücks. ich versuchte mich hier in einer art phänomenologie der wiederholung. es tauchen hier u.a.
a) mechanische, “tote” wiederholungen
b) differente, gescratchte wiederholungen
c) geschichtete und zeitdifferente wiederholungen als mobiles und kanons
d) und kombinationen von a-c
auf.

dw 1.2 entstand auf anregung von erik drescher als umarbeitung des trios für flöte, cello und klavier zu flöte, saxophon und klavier. aufgrund der teilweise völlig veränderten klanglichkeit wurden alle partien neu konzipiert, das klangmaterial weitgehend umstrukturiert.

bernhard lang, wien, 04.04.2002 Homepage, Bernard Lang

Bernhard_Lang_04(c)Ramin_Mizani_450h

Alexander Scriabin – Sonata No.5 Op.53 (1907)

The Piano Sonata No.5, Op. 53, is  written by Alexander Scriabin in 1907. This was his first sonata to be written in one movement,  a format he retained from then on. A typical performance lasts from 11 to 12 minutes.

“The Fifth Sonata, one of the most frequently played of the composer’s works, owes a great deal to the orchestral Poem of Ecstasy, and for this reason the Sonata is occasionally given that same title. Both draw on a poem by written by Scriabin, of which four lines are affixed to the beginning of the Sonata (a passage which “calls to life” the artist’s “hidden longings,” an example of the composer’s ever-increasing obsession with his own creative powers)…”  [source]

Original Russian text: Я к жизни призываю вас, скрытые стремленья!Вы, утонувшие в темных глубинахДуха творящего, вы, боязливыеЖизни зародыши, вам дерзновенье приношу!

Original French translation: Je vous appelle à la vie, ô forces mysterieuses! Noyées dans les obscures profondeurs De l’esprit créateur, craintivesEbauches de vie, à vous j’apporte l’audace!

English translation: I call you to life, oh mysterious forces! Drowned in the obscure depths Of the creative spirit, timid Shadows of life, to you I bring audacity! [ source]

Sonata No.5 Op.53 played by Glenn Gould :

Sonata No.5 Op.53 played by Vladimir Sofronitsky (live):

Sonata No.5 Op.53 played by Bernd Glemser :

800px-Alexander_Scriabin,_Tatiana_Schloezer_and_Leonid_Sabaneev_on_the_banks_of_the_Oka_RiverAlexander Scriabin, Tatiana Schloezer and Leonid Sabaneev on the banks of the Oka River, 1912.

Franz Schubert – Ave Maria (1825)

“Ellens dritter Gesang” (Ellens Gesang III, D. 839, Op. 52, No. 6, 1825), in English: “Ellen’s Third Song”, was composed by Franz Schubert in 1825 as part of his Opus 52, a setting of seven songs from Walter Scott´s popular epic poem The Lady of the Lake, loosely translated into German.

It has become one of Schubert’s most popular works, recorded by a wide variety and large number of singers, under the title of Ave Maria, in arrangements with various lyrics which commonly differ from the original context of the poem. It was arranges in three versions for piano by Franz Liszt. [source]

Maria Callas – Vocal / Unknown – Piano

 

Franz+Schubert+Schubert+playing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[Dedicated my father, who died in Tanzania 07.04.1995. Rest in peace]

Conlon Nancarrow – Study for Player Piano 3a (1988)

From the album Studies For Player Piano by Conlon Nancarrow, recorded on Conlon Nancarrow’s custom-altered 1927 Ampico reproducing piano at the studio of the composer in Mexico City on January 10 and 12, 1988.

 Conlon Nancarrow’s Studies for Player Piano is a cycle of work unique in many respects, not the least being its seeming indivisibility from itself. As the primary text of the music is a hand-punched piano roll intended to be played on specific, Ampico model player pianos, it does not lead to a wide range of options in terms of interpretation. Studies for Player Piano, stems from master tapes made in Mexico City for release on the 1750 Arch label in the 1970s and ’80s, with Nancarrow´s own specially retrofitted pianos, in Nancarrow´s studio, and with the composer himself picking tempos and working with producer Charles Amirkhanian to achieve ideal results. These recordings were considered state of the art at the time and still sound great, and can certainly be considered definitive; CDs drawing from sources made later represent the music as played back by other machines and operators. While the differences might be slight, they are still significant, particularly in regard to tempo choices, which can either make or break this music, and breaking it isn’t hard to do at all. Hearing them played back on Nancarrow´s pianos also affords an additional layer of articulation missing from many reproductions; one of Nancarrow´s pianos was fitted with metal hammers, resulting a clattery sense of attack, whereas the other had hammers covered with leather strips for a more mellow sound. Make no mistake about it: the Other Minds set truly represents what Nancarrow himself wanted you to hear when it came to his player piano music, and he did have very specific ideas about that. [source]

Conlon Nancarrow – Piano

 

url-7

Beethoven – Piano Sonatas (1795 – 1822)

Ludwig van Beethoven wrote his 32 piano sonatas between 1795 and 1822. Although originally not intended to be a meaningful whole, as a set they comprise one of the most important collections of works in the history of music. Hans von Bülow even called them “The New Testament” of music (Johann Sebastian Bach´s The Well-Tempered Clavier being “The Old Testament”.

Beethoven’s piano sonatas came to be seen as the first cycle of major piano pieces suited to concert hall performance. Being suitable for both private and public performance, Beethoven’s sonatas form “a bridge between the worlds of the salon and the concert hall”.

Camille Saint-Saëns, in his debut public recital at the age of ten, offered to play as an encore any of Beethoven’s 32 piano sonatas from memory.

In a single concert cyclus, the whole 32 sonatas were first performed by Hans von Bülow; the first to make a complete recording was Artur Schnabel in 1927 (he was also the first since von Bülow to play the complete cycle in concert from memory). [source]

[List of the sonatas]

Glenn Gould – Piano

 

MI0003436841

url-2

Witold Lutosławski – Partita For Violin And Orchestra (1984 – 1988)

Partita For Violin And Orchestra was composed by Witold Lutosławski from 1984 to 1988 and was dedicated to the violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter. The premiere was 10 January 1990, Munich: Anne-Sophie Mutter, Munich Philharmonic Orchestra, Witold Lutosławski.

Witold Lutosławski ( January 25, 1913 – February 7, 1994) was a Polish composer and conductor. He was one of the major European composers of the 20th century, and one of the preeminent Polish musicians during his last three decades.

Through the mid-1980s, Lutosławski composed three pieces called Łańcuch (“Chain”), which refers to the way the music is constructed from contrasting strands which overlap like the links of a chain. Chain 2 was written for Anne- Sophie Mutter (commissioned by Paul Sacher), and for Mutter he also orchestrated his slightly earlier Partita for violin and piano, providing a new linking Interlude, so that when played together the Partita, Interlude and Chain 2 form his longest work. [source]

1. Allegro Giusto (4:14)
1. Ad Libitum (1:12)
3. Largo (6.23)
4. Ad Libitum (0:47)
5. Presto (3.52)

Witold Lutosławski – Conductor
Phillip Moll – Piano
Anne-Sophie Mutter  – Violin
BBC Symphony Orchestra

Witold Lutoslawski

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[List of Witold Lutosławski´s complete works]